Waterfowl Hunting on Certain Bodies of Water

Hunting Waterfowl is prohibited within certain distances of residences on portions or all of the following bodies of water:

Body of Water County / Area Distance
Bear Creek Lancaster 200 yards
Broadway Lake Anderson 200 yards
Gills Creek Lancaster 200 yards
Lake Greenwood Greenwood, Laurens, Newberry 200 yards
Lake Keowee Oconee, Pickens 200 yards
Lake Murray Newberry & Saluda
200 yards
Lexington & Richland 350 yards
Lake Wateree Fairfield, Kershaw, Lancaster 200 yards
Lake Marion Potato Creek 200 yards
Wyboo Creek 200 yards
Dean Swamp in Clarendon County and adjacent to Santee Cooper Resort in Orangeburg County. 200 yards
Public waters in Calhoun County from the confluence of the Congaree and Wateree Rivers downstream to Poplar Creek. 200 yards
The coves immediately to the East of St. Julien Subdivision Extension and Cypress Shores Marina. 200 yards
Taw Caw Creek in Clarendon County No Hunting
The cove immediately to the SE of the Indian Bluff Recreation site. No Hunting
Lake Moultrie Berkeley 200 yards
Lake Wylie York 200 yards
Murrell's Inlet Creek Georgetown 100 yards

It is unlawful to hunt waterfowl on the lakes listed above within the distances provided unless a person has written permission from the owner and occupant of the dwelling. There are no exceptions to the distance restriction on Lake Keowee.

Areas Closed to Goose Harvest on Lake Marion

Areas Closed to Goose Harvest During the Regular Season

The following areas are closed to goose harvest during the regular waterfowl season:

East of US 301: That portion of Clarendon County bounded to the North by Edwards Drive in Summerton and S-14-25; to the East by Hwy 260; and to the South by the markers delineating the channel of the Santee River.

West of US 301: That portion of Clarendon County bounded on the North by S-14-26 extending southward to that portion of Orangeburg County bordered by Hwy 6.

Print a PDF version of Areas Closed to Goose Harvest

 

 

 

Ethical Question: How Far Is Too Far?

Many times, hunters take shots at waterfowl that are too far away. Commonly known by waterfowlers as “sky busting,” these shots either miss all together or end up crippling the bird so that it dies wastefully elsewhere. Hunters have a misconception that modern waterfowl loads allow for even farther shots. This is not necessarily true. Try limiting your shots to 30-45 yards. You will be more successful and your neighbor will thank you.

Remember ethics preserve the hunter's opportunity to hunt.