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** Archived Article - please check for current information. **

July 24, 2012

‘Longleaf, as Far as the Eye Can See’ theme of Longleaf Alliance conference set for Oct. in Texas

The Longleaf Alliance will hold its 9th Biennial Regional Longleaf Conference Oct. 23-26 in Nacogdoches, Texas, the “Oldest Town in Texas” and home to Stephen F. Austin State University.
           
The Longleaf Alliance, of which the S.C. Department of Natural Resources is a partner, works to conserve and restore significant functioning longleaf pine ecosystems across the Southeastern United States forest landscape. The longleaf pine ecosystem once occupied an estimated 90 million acres in the region and its unique and favorable economic, ecological and social values have been well documented. By the early 1990s, only about 2.8 million acres of this once vast and majestic forest remained. Due in large part to the efforts of The Longleaf Alliance and its many partners over many years, the acreage in longleaf forest has increased to about 3.2 million acres, the first such increase since the time of settlement.
           
The Oct. 23-26 Longleaf Alliance conference is open to individuals and organizations with interest in longleaf pine and associated plant and animal communities including private landowners, managers, consultants, conservation groups, university researchers and outreach personnel, forest industry and agency personnel.

The general sessions and field tour will focus on needs, successes, and opportunities in longleaf pine management for the private and public sectors. The poster sessions and associated socials will be open to a wide range of topics and will be used to foster partnerships between individuals and organizations in the public and private sectors. Emphasis will be placed on addressing economic, understory, ecological, and social/political issues challenging landowners and resource managers interested in the management and restoration of longleaf pine.


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