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April 9, 2010

Retired DNR Marine Resources director winner of 2009 Environmental Awareness Award

Fred Holland of Charleston has been named winner of the 2009 South Carolina Environmental Awareness Award at an award ceremony held in Columbia on March 31.
           
Holland was recognized by Scott English, Governor Mark Sanford's Chief of Staff, for his outstanding contributions to estuarine and coastal ecology research as well as his lifelong dedication to the state’s coastal environment.
             
"Fred Holland is not just a steward of natural resources in South Carolina, he is a pioneer and in some cases, a national trend-setter for protecting and preserving our coastal resources," English said in making the presentation.
           
Holland, a native South Carolinian, became director of the S.C. Department of Natural Resources’ Marine Resources Research Institute at Fort Johnson in Charleston in 1991. In 2001, Holland was named director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Hollings Marine Laboratory until his retirement in 2008.
           
"Fred’s legacy is important for two reasons," English said. "He has been able to translate in-depth scientific research for policymakers and the average person in making decisions that affect our communities.

At the same time, he has mentored a new generation of marine scientists who will carry on his work in marine sciences."
           
The S.C. General Assembly established the S.C. Environmental Awareness Award in 1992 to recognize outstanding contributions toward the protection, conservation and improvement of South Carolina's natural resources.
           
The award is sponsored by the S.C. Department of Natural Resources, S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control, S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, and the S.C. Forestry Commission.
           
Previous award winners include:

South Carolina's natural resources are essential for economic development and contribute nearly $30 billion and 230,000 jobs to the state's economy. Find out why Life's Better Outdoors.


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