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State Climate Office                
SPECIAL NEWS RELEASE #13-7          DNR News 803-667-0696
April 24, 2013

Drought officially over for all South Carolina Counties

South Carolina Drought Map for April 24, 2013

Move cursor over the dates below to view a previous drought status map.
Jan 31, 2013 |  Dec 11, 2012 |  Sep 27, 2012 |  Jul 19, 2012 |  Jun 6, 2012 |  Apr 25, 2012 | 
Mar 9, 2012 |  Nov 8, 2011 |  Sep 29, 2011 |  Sep 8, 2011 |  Jul 14, 2011 |  Jun 17, 2011 | 
Jun 2, 2011 |  Feb 3, 2011 |  Nov 23, 2010 |  Oct 7, 2010 |  Jul 9, 2010 |  Dec 9, 2009 | 
Oct 16, 2009 |  Sep 24, 2009 |  Sep 2, 2009 |  Jun 10, 2009 |  Apr 15, 2009 |  Feb 19, 2009 | 
Oct 28, 2008 |  Sep 16, 2008 |  Aug 5, 2008 |  Jun 30, 2008 |  Apr 16, 2008 |  Jan 22, 2008 | 
Sep 5, 2007 |  Jun 6, 2007 |  May 8, 2007 |  Feb 23, 2007 |  Sep 20, 2006 |  Aug 16, 2006 | 
Apr 27, 2006 | 
For previously issued drought statements see the archived status reports.

Table of all counties and drought status.
Drought Response Committee Meeting Sign-In sheet.

Discussion:

The drought is officially over for all South Carolina counties according to the S.C. Drought Response Committee. The committee via a conference call meeting on April 24th downgraded the drought from moderate to no drought for 22 counties and from incipient to no drought for the remaining counties.

Chris Bickley, Executive Director, Lowcountry Council of Governments and representative from the West Drought Management Area stressed, "The Committee usually avoids downgrading the drought two levels, but in today's decision there was consistent and overwhelming support from all the drought indicators combined with a high probability for above normal precipitation in the upcoming weeks."

According to Hope Mizzell, SC State Climatologist, "Most stations across the State reported 100% to 225% of normal rainfall over the past 60 days (see table). The most important factor ending the drought; however, has been the State's adequate rainfall for an extended 5-month period, which coincided with the hydrologic recharge season."

S.C. Observed Rainfall Summary Ending April 24, 2013

STATION NAMERAINFALL
(Inches)
% OF NORMAL STATION NAME RAINFALL
(Inches)
% OF NORMAL
Winnsboro 7.02 88 Walhall 1.5 NW* 14.00130
Cheraw 6.5788 Andrews 9.04134
Darlington 7.83105 Brookgreen Gardens 11.69158
Columbia Metro 8.22105 Edisto Island 11.54171
Anderson 9.71106 Walterboro 1 SW 12.83171
Saluda 8.89106 Allendale 2 NW 13.25 181
Sumter 8.14109 Varnville 6.7 SW* 14.85200
Orangeburg 2 8.19116 Charleston 6.8W* 15.37225

* Stations from Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network

Joe Gellici, State Hydrologist, reported that normal to above-normal rainfall during the crucial recharge season has greatly improved streamflow conditions statewide. In December 2012, 12 out of 17 monitored streams were in severe or extreme drought. Only one stream at this time is in drought according to the Drought Regulations criteria and that is North Fork Edisto which is in incipient drought.

Reports from agriculture were positive with the USDA Farm Service Agency reporting only 2% of the State with inadequate soil moisture to start the growing season. The presentation from SC Forestry Commission was also encouraging with reports of below average fire activity during April and no drought-related fire control issues.

Drought Response Committee Chairman Ken Rentiers said, "The last time the State was drought-free was June 2010 with only 10 total drought-free months going back to July 2006. Drought episodes since the late 1990s have highlighted the importance of South Carolina's coordinated state and local drought response. The time and effort of each Drought Response Committee member has been vital to the process and greatly appreciated. After enduring these multi-year droughts we have learned to be vigilant and we will continue to monitor the situation closely."

DNR protects and manages South Carolina's natural resources by making wise and balanced decisions for the benefit of the state's natural resources and its people. Find out more about DNR at the DNR Web site.

Drought Status Table

Current Drought Status by County
Normal Incipient Moderate Severe Extreme
County
Status
County
Status
County
Status
County
Status
County
Status
ABBEVILLE
Normal
AIKEN
Normal
ALLENDALE
Normal
ANDERSON
Normal
BAMBERG
Normal
BARNWELL
Normal
BEAUFORT
Normal
BERKELEY
Normal
CALHOUN
Normal
CHARLESTON
Normal
CHEROKEE
Normal
CHESTER
Normal
CHESTERFIELD
Normal
CLARENDON
Normal
COLLETON
Normal
DARLINGTON
Normal
DILLON
Normal
DORCHESTER
Normal
EDGEFIELD
Normal
FAIRFIELD
Normal
FLORENCE
Normal
GEORGETOWN
Normal
GREENVILLE
Normal
GREENWOOD
Normal
HAMPTON
Normal
HORRY
Normal
JASPER
Normal
KERSHAW
Normal
LANCASTER
Normal
LAURENS
Normal
LEE
Normal
LEXINGTON
Normal
MARION
Normal
MARLBORO
Normal
MCCORMICK
Normal
NEWBERRY
Normal
OCONEE
Normal
ORANGEBURG
Normal
PICKENS
Normal
RICHLAND
Normal
SALUDA
Normal
SPARTANBURG
Normal
SUMTER
Normal
UNION
Normal
WILLIAMSBURG
Normal
YORK
Normal


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Sign-In Sheet

SC Drought Response Committee Meeting, April 24, 2013
Sign-In sheet
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